Donor Spotlight: Carl Caricari

In this interview, we hear from one of ACG’s most ardent supporters, Carl Caricari. A long-time member of ACG’s Board of Directors and current President-elect, Carl was the Education Committee’s first chairperson, and from the beginning has played an integral role in making ACG Education what it is today. Find out what has kept him involved since 2008!

 


What’s one thing you wish everyone knew about Austin Classical Guitar?

My favorite thing about ACG is how we impact the lives of students. I am always surprised when I meet people who have come to many of our concerts and love the music, but don’t know about our education services. Our education program has been around since 2001 when it started in one school with 15 kids, and now we’re in 60 schools serving 4,000 students, each week! For me, it’s all about the kids. It’s about the lives we’ve impacted positively through guitar. And now, we’re partnering with schools throughout Texas and around the country to help build new programs. That’s what I want more people to know about.

“I love going to the concerts we present with the world’s greatest guitarists, but hearing students perform is incredible. I love seeing young people on stage for the first time, feeling good about themselves and what they are doing. This is what keeps me coming back.”

How did you get involved with ACG? And what has kept you so involved over the years?

Almost 10 years ago, John Henry McDonald, the Vice President of ACG’s board, and his wife Louise invited me to hear a concert by the Brazilian Guitar Quartet. I was blown away. About a week later, John Henry called me and asked if I would consider being on the board. I said no. I didn’t know anything about music! But I agreed to meet with Matt Hinsley for coffee. I still remember the moment Matt told me about ACG’s education programs and the work they were doing with kids. That’s when I knew I wanted to get involved, and I became a board member.

I was excited to lead the Education Committee because I had a hunch that our education programs were attracting diverse students and that guitar was a positive outlet for them. That’s when we met with Dr. Calvin Streeter from U.T. Austin’s School of Social Work and commissioned his team to do a social impact study. What the study found was astounding: 90% of the students in our school guitar programs hadn’t taken an arts class before. The study also revealed the positive impact our classes were having on students’ self-esteem, and their ability to collaborate and work as a team. These days, I love going to the concerts we present with the world’s greatest guitarists, but hearing students perform is incredible. Seeing young people onstage feeling good about themselves and what they are doing, this is what keeps me coming back.

Why did you choose to include ACG in your planned giving, and what led you to decide you wanted to support the endowment through your bequest?

ACG is an organization that puts effort into its community, and I think it’s important for someone in my position to provide support so the organization can focus on service. I’ve been able to make a comfortable life for myself, and now I feel it’s my turn to give back.

I believe in the power of musical experiences to change the lives of young people for the better. Our programs engage all kinds of kids. Some students might have gotten into trouble, but with guitar we’re able to provide an inspiring experience that can help keep them from making bad decisions. I’ve seen it happen. Students start learning to play guitar, and by practicing hard and performing, they gain confidence and self-esteem, and this sticks with them the rest of their lives. ACG Education has been doing this for 15 years, and building a healthy endowment will ensure that our work in education will continue long after I’m gone.